Women in the Arena

Unlocking Brilliance: A Conversation with Bomi Anise

August 23, 2023 Audra Agen Season 6 Episode 3
Women in the Arena
Unlocking Brilliance: A Conversation with Bomi Anise
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Life is like an ever-evolving book, with chapters that provide us a chance to define who we are. But are we truly harnessing the potential that each page offers? Join me, as I have an enlightening conversation with Bomi Anise, an international corporate attorney and transformative expert, about how to unlock the inherent brilliance within us, and how to challenge our inner status quo.

Bomi and I traverse through the chapters of self-care, self-compassion, and courage. We look at the mirror and reflect on how the world echoes our deeply-held beliefs. Bomi shares an evocative story of how her family name became a relentless driving force, sometimes leading to exhaustion. Our conversation takes a turn to the importance of slowing down, reconnecting with the present, and savoring life's journey.

Our chat highlights the power of mindfulness, self-praise and the art of appreciating smaller moments in life. We also discuss how unlocking and reclaiming our brilliance can have a profound impact on the lives of those around us. And, Bomi shares how she found the courage to slow down and truly relish in life's journey. Tune in to this episode and discover the power of your inherent brilliance.

https://www.thebrillianceparadigm.com/

Go check out all of our episodes on our website: https://womeninthearena.net/


If you are ready to tell your story or want to refer someone, please email me at audra@womeninthearena.net

***Last thing- I'd love to interview the following women:

  • Joan Jett
  • Dolly Parton
  • Viola Davis
  • Ina Garten

Maybe you can help me get there****


Thank you all for supporting this show and all of the Women in the Arena!!

Audra :

Welcome in everyone and thank you so much for joining me again this week. This week we're gonna have a heart-to-heart talk. We're gonna have some down-to-earth girl talk, and I am so excited to have this conversation because it's timely. It's also very vulnerable, but I hope that it's gonna do some good. So this week's guest is a remarkable woman. I am joined by Bomi Anise, and she is this amazing international woman Not an international woman of mystery, but an international woman of energy and of action. She is a corporate attorney and she's worked in five different countries on two different continents, but she's also recognized as a strategic leader and a transformative expert. She also has been described as a changemaker and a high-energy connector. That is exactly what we need right now. She also has this amazing ability to see people for the potential of who they can be rather than how they see themselves today. She's also the author of the upcoming book the Brilliant's Paradigm why Unlocking and Owning Our Brilliant Transforms the Way we Live and Lead. It is my pleasure and honor to introduce to you Bomi Anise Bomi, thank you so much for joining me today and welcome to the show, oh thank you so much, Audra.

Bomi:

This has been such an amazing thing. Thank you so much for inviting me to have this conversation and to be a part of your remarkable, wonderful connecting show.

Audra :

Thank you First of all. Thank you so much for being here and thank you for being part of the community. You are now an official member of the Women in the Arena community, because that's how I see us as a giant community and a growing sisterhood and brotherhood, because we have a few brave men that have joined us too and we can't do it without them. And that kind of leads us into this conversation of what you and I had started, and it's fascinating and remarkable, and I want to warn everybody yeah, it's going to probably touch you in a few ways that you're like I don't like the way that feels, because that's probably something that we need to discuss more of. And that's challenging the status quo, and we do that great externally, but the part that I think some of us are struggling with is challenging the status quo within, and this is your passion. So let's start there. What does it mean to you to challenge the status quo within yourself? Let me start.

Bomi:

So what I truly believe, and, in fact, what science tells us, is that actually, we are one in an eternity creation. There is no one, nothing like us, that's ever going to be like us. The combination of DNA, the combination of our experiences, our culture, the people who've been around us, the countries where we grew up All of that forms and shapes the rules, the beliefs, who we are, and yet, oftentimes, when we're looking for what inspires us, when we're looking for peace, when we're looking for fulfillment, we look outside of ourselves, and what I realize is actually the things that are outside of us are the very things, most of the time, we cannot control. But we can control ourselves, we can control our minds, we can control what we believe about ourselves, and yet, a lot of times, what we don't do is actually connect with ourselves, and I think it's one of those areas where I'm guilty of this. I'm absolutely guilty of this. No self-care, taking care of everybody else instead of before I even remote myself, pushing through, like in enormously stressful situations, and yet pushing through like oh no, no, I got this, oh, it's fine, it's fine, I'm fine when, really, really, if we took a step back, paused and listened to ourselves, to our bodies, to our patterns? Actually, we're not. And then the other thing that I think that we always think about is that we're not. And then the other thing that I think that we often do is that we don't tap into the innate brilliance that we have. So I have two young little nephews they are the most adorable things. And then think about how we treat children, how we treat babies oh my gosh, the baby is so cute, it's perfect. Or when a baby's first tooth comes in oh my gosh, look how they're growing. Their first tooth comes in. We applaud absolutely everything they do. Oh, they ate a piece of solid food for the first time. We applaud this, and then somehow, someway, time moves on and that's all forgotten, we forget, and I think it's really time to go back to Finding that brilliance, finding that within ourselves. I believe that that to be that. I believe that to be one of the most important antidotes to all of the hurt and pain, stress, distraction, anger that we are seeing in the world today.

Audra :

Where do you think we lost that Spark? Where we disconnected from ourselves and how remarkable we really are. And I know it didn't happen all at once, it happened a little at a time, but but why do you think we do that?

Bomi:

I Think it's also human nature Sort of I heard, so I can't remember where I heard this, but nature tells us don't stand out Because you think about it as an animal in the wild. If you stand out again, if you stand out. Why do animals come in a herd right? Because then it's protection, as, as human beings, our human nature is to protect ourselves by any means necessary, and by standing out, we often would be a target. We we'd be dead out in the wild back in the day. And so, really evolving and understanding, okay, there is this innate, natural desire to hide ourselves that has to be balanced, encountered with the amazing things, the brilliance, the innovation that comes from people actually living out their brilliance and using it to solve problems and serve communities and think of what the world would be like, in terms of all of our modern-day inventions, if People didn't have the courage to believe in the brilliance, their thoughts, their ideas, no matter how crazy people thought it was at the time, but really, really trusting and believing in themselves. I think it's partly human nature, but we are, as humans, so evolved in our minds in a way that we Can raise that awareness and raise that consciousness and make a choice.

Audra :

We're fighting that natural Fight or flight instinct that is innate in all of us. It's not something that you can turn on and off, it just is. It just sits there because that's how we're built. It's for protection. But you're saying, because we've evolved as humans and the majority of us are not living out in the wild and Having to protect ourselves from from dangers from all sides, most of us don't live that way I'm sure there's some that do. Most of us don't that we have the ability and and the responsibility to ourselves and to the world. Because what you're telling me is that if we don't live to our full brilliance, we're not serving the purpose for which we were put here. Because you said there's a we're one in a trillion event, so everybody has a purpose. And if we don't recognize our natural ability, we're not only robbing ourselves from whatever that purpose is, but the world as well. Yeah, your book is this Brilliant's paradigm. So I'm starting to understand why you called it the brilliant's paradigm, because you're literally saying let's shift from this idea of hiding and protecting ourselves to Shifting into our brilliance.

Bomi:

So tell me more about that. You hit the nail right on my head. That's exactly it we do. We owe it to ourselves, we owe it to Humanity, we owe it to the world to really connect with ourselves and understand where our brilliance lies and in doing so and In deciding the problems you want to solve and the communities that we want to serve, and how, how our brilliance provides values, value to and within the community, then that's how we get innovation, that's how we get fulfillment, that's where we get connection. Again, really, it's such an important part and such an important piece, I think, to do creating a world that has a lot less violence, a lot less anger, a lot less persuasion, a lot more connection, a lot more fulfillment. I mean, when we Think about it, whenever we feel that we're good at something, we get that dopamine fix. Oh you know it's amazing and and then we feel light, we feel open, we're excited, we feel fulfilled. And If we could shift the way that we have traditionally thought, been taught to think it's not any fault of our own, that's just the way things fall. But if we can consciously choose a different paradigm, choose the brilliant paradigm to see own unlock and launch our own brilliance into the world, I just honestly believe that the world would. There would be so much more collaboration, there would be so much more fulfillment, there would be so much more joy. Right now, the way that the world is hurtling towards anger and violence and frustration, I truly believe that we are at a precipice, about to pull off, if not already hurtling down, that we've got to do something to stop it and the only thing that we can control really are our sights and what we feel and what we believe.

Audra :

So I'm going to ask questions specifically about you, because you are your best test case in this brilliant paradigm. You are an incredibly remarkable attorney that has done business worldwide. You are acknowledged and recognized for your achievements and for your actions on how you have served your clients throughout your career. Most people would look at that and say she's doing what she intended. She's doing what she was supposed to do. She's doing what she was educated to do. When did you realize that that wasn't enough?

Bomi:

Whoa, that's a good question. So all through. So it's funny. I became a lawyer, funnily enough, because I originally thought I was going to be a human rights lawyer. As circumstance would have it, that didn't quite come to pass, even though that was still always. Social justice issues and human rights law was something that I was always doing in the background in my spare time. That said, the reason I wanted to become a lawyer was because I saw the law as a means for social change. I didn't know, I was the first well, I'm the first and only person in my family to be a man, of human, to be a lawyer but I thought that that's the way that you make a change in society through laws and because laws help inform people's behavior. Now fast forward to law school. That very any lawyer out there will know that that is very much a different reality, generally speaking, to what happens when you go into law school. However, law school the one thing that law school does it gives you a framework, a way to see the world and to think and to analyze and make decisions and make choices really as adults, as people. What's one of the things that we try and learn how to do? Make better decisions. I've had a phenomenal career. I have done super exciting things in my career, helping to resolve disputes that you can only imagine when you open the Wall Street Journal or the Financial Times and thinking, oh my gosh, it's gonna be on my desk today Through to helping people in other ways with transactions, with disputes, understanding the laws and how not to get into trouble with the law sort of preventative things that people want to be able to do. So it's been wonderful and I've learned a tremendous, tremendous amount. But what I always realize, even through the course of all of my career, is that one of the things I love doing is bringing people together. One of the things I really love doing is actually helping people expand and learn so that they can be the best that they can be. You can do that only so much, I think, in different environments. It's all been there, but I felt that actually the culmination of all of my experiences having lived in France, lived in the PBI, lived in Russia, lived in England and the States that bringing all of that together and everything that I've learned and seeing actually that there's far more that connects us and makes us similar than it does to buy this I felt that it was, and also in my career and experience and seeing the extent to which so many people men do it. But I would say this is gonna be a generalization Men do it less, but women, and women of color as well, tend to and I'm guilty of this as much as I'm a bubbly happy person sort of dimming my light. It's very easy to do. Nobody wants the rejection, nobody wants to necessarily feel like, ooh, what if I'm not liked? What if I don't belong? What if I say something wrong? What if I get it wrong Right, then what? And so I think this writing the book, as I say, as I've come to realize, writing the book is as much for me as taking the courage to actually bring out what I have learned in all of these years and the courage to do that which, in many respects, sort of, or conquer that which, in many respects, I have hidden me, but also as a lesson to everybody else, or at least just one person, if one person can read this book and learn from it, learn the ways, the ways that I have learned to overcome Right and the things that oh I get, let's help me back. And oh I get that I can choose differently and, oh, I Can expand and elevate myself with the support and community to expand what I thought was even possible for myself. If I can give that to just one person, so that they themselves Feel fulfilled and can really start to live as who they were truly meant to be, then it would be well worth it.

Audra :

You know, what I hear, which is so Exciting and encouraging, is that you've lived an amazing life, you've had an incredible career, but there was always room for more. Even though you have done some things that we can only imagine, only imagine there was still more for you to do and an even more fulfilling way. What I'm hearing is that you may live an incredible, exciting life, but you still have potential for more. Don't limit yourself. That is exciting, that is encouraging, and I want to hear more about the hows and whys of how we start to figure out, if we are turning our light down a little bit. So give it. I obviously don't want to give the book away. It's not. It's not out yet, but it will be.

Bomi:

Give us some ideas on what this journey could look like so one thing I wanted to say was sort of continue on what you were saying about just there's always more. One of the ways that I like to think for that is we have chapters. Right, our life is like a long book. We have chapters, and each chapter, each moment gives us the same, each moments moment gives us the opportunity to choose who we want to be. One story that I always tell is that I have this neighbor, mr Fisher grew up with Mr Fisher. He happened to be the principal of high school, but he lived down the street. Mr Fisher is probably now 97 sharp, as anything Sort of really still mischievous, funny, and I remember at his 19th birthday party he was boogieing on the dance floor with people I mean just larger than life. So Not too long ago, I, you know, I always say, oh, I want to be like mr Fisher when I grow up. And I just I asked him a couple of years ago. I said so, mr Fisher, what's the secret? You're happy, you know, he's still good, volunteer pre-covid, he's still volunteer, yeah, yeah, I mean really active. And he just said I always stretch yourself. And I think it goes back to exactly what you were saying Don't limit yourself it and and for me that's always been it doesn't matter what age you are, there are no shoulds. We can sit there with all of the shoulds we want to. But really that what it doesn't have to look a certain way, it really just does have to work for each and every one of us. It's what I've been able to come up with. It's sort of like in the book is sort of an acronym of things of how to go about this with the key important things to really unlock and own Rebellions, and, and the acronym is sort of be and care, be and care, and I think those two acronyms are sort of the story. Even behind them is the reason why be is because we really need to be our Authentic self. But the be stands for the first step to unlocking and owning our balance is really to believe. Brilliance is within us. We just have to be willing to believe it, see it owner and long term. And if you don't believe, if you don't change your mind, you can't move forward. So the first step is actually to believe. And then the E stands for Expand and elevate. We've got to Connect with each other and start actively for ourselves. This is prime example what you were doing right connecting Amazing, incredible women so that they have their voice and they can share what they know and their experience, so that others can do it, so that we can support each other, so that we can expand our vision Field of vision of what we know is possible, so that we can then start connecting and then we elevate. Because my belief is the time that I spend with you, the time that I spend with other people, what I learn from other people and this has been true, certainly in my experiences every single country where I've gone to and certainly where I've lived has it has sold within me a deep part of their culture, of their ideas, of their thoughts, of their rituals that has become a true part of me and that lives within me and how I live my life. That's expanded me. Why do we go to school? Why do we get education? Why do we know why? Because we want to expand the way that we think, because we want to elevate ourselves. Okay, well, there's more than one way to learn. Statistics and sort of old sort of educational thinking theory says that experiential learning actually is one of the most effective ways to learn and engage. Well, if I learn from you because we're connecting and I have that experience and I see how that experience has expanded you and what you've been able to do, and I never thought of that before. Well, well then I then grow and then, if we continue, then we just keep growing and growing and growing as individuals, and everybody keeps expanding and everybody elevates, and then it becomes a win-win situation and that's how innovation comes, that's how collaboration comes, new ideas, growth, so the B and then the care. The care aspect of things is really because we get to stop caring for ourselves.

Audra :

Isn't that funny that we have to give ourselves permission to do that, which is it should be a natural human instinct, but it's not. And women are again a generalization, but women are probably more guilty of that than others because we're so concerned about everybody else that we're the last on our list and if we don't have any energy left, it doesn't get done.

Bomi:

Absolutely, and then if it's not going to get done, it's okay. If it doesn't get done for me, I don't want to let other people down, so I don't have time to go to the gym, I don't have time to eat properly, I don't have time to get eight hours of sleep. I was the biggest culprit of that. I thought sleep was. I honestly believe that sleep was optional. I don't want to miss out. There's like too much that needs to be done.

Audra :

Go, go, go, gotta go, you and I must be related, because there are many times that I have said out loud if I didn't have to take time to sleep, I'd have so much more done.

Bomi:

I guess I could sleep when I'm dead. Let's go.

Audra :

We're definitely related. I've said that too.

Bomi:

Oh gosh, you know, I mean sort of I'm reminded, I don't know. So I love music, I absolutely love music. And I took my daughter and a friend and my sister. We all went to the Lizzo concert and we were like, oh, it was absolutely amazing, Talk about history making. That was the concert in Washington DC where she played Madison's Crystal Fruit. That had been played. Oh my gosh, yeah, yes, that one.

Audra :

Oh my gosh, you were there for that.

Bomi:

We were there for that we were there for that. It was so amazing, it was beautiful. But she started that show with when was the last time you said sleep and climbed to yourself? What Exactly exactly? It hit me that was just like oh my gosh.

Audra :

Yeah, oh, I got that same reaction. Were you saying that I'm like, oh my gosh.

Bomi:

Care, care, care, self-care, self-compassion right, we need that for our longevity, we need that for our fulfillment. If we don't start with ourselves. You know it's so cliche, the oxygen mask principle, right, but we don't believe it, we don't see it, and then we don't realize just how much negativity we feed to ourselves about ourselves, with our language, with our behavior. And then what we don't realize is that actually often the world is actually what's happening to us around the world, in the world, is actually often a reflection, a mirror of what we deeply, deeply believe or you don't believe about ourselves. If we don't take care of ourselves, why should anybody else take care of us? If we don't speak up and have other people hear our voices, why do we think anybody is going to listen or tell us to speak? We've got to care for ourselves. And so the sea really starts for and this is kind of a big big part of the book, which is courageously choosing rules and beliefs that serve us we kind of go rote, we just go like row-walks, right. We don't even realize those rules and beliefs that you get from your family, from your culture, from your DNA. Have you ever noticed like somebody say oh, my goodness, when you do that. It's just like your grandmother right, like you don't even know somebody who you may not even have met, some long lost relative, that you've long gone relative, and somebody says, oh my gosh, she's just beating it. Oh, she does that same, that same thing that you know. These are all things. It's not our fault at all. but these are all things that just happen. But we owe it to us, those two, to really take a step back and really interrogate all of those things and then courageously and I say courageously because it does take courage to choose to sort of decide which ones are we gonna keep and which ones are actually. Which ones are we gonna keep because they serve us and which ones are we going to let go because they don't.

Audra :

But those take bravery. Yeah, oh cool, because it could be innate, it could be something that. It could be something that definitely goes against what you've been taught, oh yeah, and may have a negative reaction and ripple through your family. Mm-hmm. You have to be brave enough to walk away from that.

Bomi:

Absolutely, absolutely, one of the big ones that I've realized for us in our family. And this is interrogating, and I was like whoa, this is so deep, I can't believe it. So our last name it's actually taken from my grandfather. Our last name is my family's, originally from Nigeria, and so it's kind of a shortened version of and the meaning is, effectively, we have something to do. And I've been thinking about that oh my gosh, we live our name. We live our name. We are anybody in our family. People will say, oh my gosh, you cannot find people who work harder. We will work ourselves to the core, to the bone. We don't know how to take breaks, we don't. I mean it is. I was like, oh my gosh, we live our name. But even sometimes to the point where we're just completely exhausted and for me, I've had several iterations of that I ended up in hospital with my blood pressure so sky high that the doctors are kind of like, if you step out of this hospital, you're going to stroke out. And I'm like, oh no, no, no, I feel fine. I mean total denial, like no, we have stuff to do, no, we have plans. And the true story true story, I literally told them. I said, oh no, but we I've organized all of these friends getting together. Um no, let's sort of, I'll come back tomorrow. I literally said I'll come back tomorrow. And they were like do? you not understand what we've said. I'm like I feel fine. I'm like, do you not understand, if you walk out of this hospital you could stroke out. You've got to stay. It's just this kind of it's this belief that I've got to go, I've got to work, I've got to do Um, and it's taken years. It has taken years and times when just been stressed out in my mind and physical manifestations of that for me to kind of say, actually, how true is it to be successful? Like, yeah, you definitely work hard. No, it depends. What's about that? I still believe that. But really, to the bone, to the core, where you're not really looking after yourself, where you're not being kind to yourself, how true is that? And when I think about it, like other people are able to do it right and be perfectly successful, we just haven't learned how to put up successful boundaries, At least until now.

Audra :

I have learned. Now. That is the gift of getting into your late 40s and 50s. You suddenly get this gift of oh, I don't have to do this anymore.

Bomi:

And I think that's where, in part with age, that's where the courage comes from, because at that point you're like I don't give.

Audra :

I don't care, I don't care. So is there for the acronym, the C is courage.

Bomi:

So this C is courageously choose rules and beliefs that serve you.

Audra :

Okay, I'm taking notes for everybody, so I can make sure that I have this in the show notes, but everybody else doesn't have to.

Bomi:

Okay. The A is act. It's really important that we take action, that we take action now and that in times when we get that imposter syndrome, when we get that fear and think that it's not possible, that's when it's time to visualize, okay, who does and let's act as it, and then also, acting consistently with your values, there's nothing more frustrating. What I have found is that, more often than not, if you get frustrated or really angry at something that somebody has done, it's normally because it's offended some deep core value that you have. And so the more that we can act consistently with the values and surround ourselves with people who act consistently with our values, the more we're able to be open and sort of the R is rewriting that narrative. You have the power to rewrite your narrative, and the other E is really enjoying the journey.

Audra :

Oh, I want you to say that again, because many of us forget that we're so concerned with the finish line, we forget the in between. So I really want you to. I want everybody to hear more about enjoying the journey.

Bomi:

You're right, you are absolutely right, alja, we are sort of again, it's that gotta go, gotta go, speed, get to the end. What's next? What's next? And we never and two things. We never stop to, or rarely, I don't want to rarely do we stop to think about conscious insights that we've gained from the journey. Those insights have been the most profound, the most valuable things, because they also help you interrogate oh well, why did that work? Oh, that worked really well. Oh, that didn't work so well. Maybe I don't want to do that again, but if we're always so busy going and chasing the next thing, the next thing and the next thing, that's all we're doing. We're wasting time, killing time right, racing through it's, taking that step back, drinking in what we're experiencing. Take the feelings, truly the feelings that we've had observed. Why do I feel this way? What's made me feel this way, whether it's a positive feeling or one that kind of brings out more negative emotions? Again, knowledge is power, knowledge is data, and it can inform our decisions on how we go. This is what a friend of mine always said. She would say well, if I have to be there anyway, I may as well have a good time. So, and we have again choice, we, if we're going along on this ride called life, then why not enjoy it? Find something to enjoy. The other thing is, what I like to say is what you see grows If what we're doing is only focusing on the negative, or negative self-talk, or after, in a work situation, after presentation, after you've done something, and you don't even take the time to acknowledge how well you've done it and you're like oh, I missed that, oh, I didn't say that, oh, I should have done this, oh, and you know we start berating ourselves. I do it, I'm the worst, so much so that I instituted this rule, and I also institute this rule for clients as well. Is it a coaching and leadership plan? I kind of say, okay, well, we're going to do a little bit of practice this For the next week. Anytime you do something, you're going to take 27 to 30 seconds and praise yourself. You've just got to acknowledge oh, this is what I did. Well, nine times out of 10, the first couple of times they do it they come back. Clients come back and say I couldn't do 30 seconds, like they can't go through a whole 30 seconds before something negative comes in. Right, it's a skill, it's a muscle to be built. So teaching ourselves how to enjoy the journey, how to enjoy ourselves, because time is sort of time, life is short. The pandemic in particular has taught us that, as almost everybody I know or have ever has been touched by a pandemic, definitely somewhere or another, and we all too often forget how fragile life is and how unpredictable it is. And yet we tend to live it as if there's an infinite amount of time.

Audra :

I can say that with it, a very fresh perspective, especially as mothers, because we think that time just goes on forever, because the days feel so long and they are. I'm not going to tell you that they're not. We have some very, very long days, but I will share with you all. Most everybody has heard that my daughter got married in April. Congratulations and thank you. It took more out of me emotionally than I expected and this is why exactly what we're talking about time, and I didn't realize how fast time went until we were sitting at her bridal shower and one of the sisters the sisters-in-law to be had gone unbeknownst to me, unbeknownst to my daughter, and had found all of these pictures of her when she was little and she went and found them. She was brilliant. She went and found them off of Facebook pictures I had posted so many years ago. I had forgotten about it, and she brought them all up and she did a slideshow and there was a picture of her when she was two and I lost it. I lost it there and I cried for about six weeks. I cried from that moment up to the wedding and a couple weeks after it, because time went so fast, because I thought to myself you were just two and now you're getting married. But you're saying that because time goes fast. We owe it to ourselves and to everybody around us to enjoy the moment.

Bomi:

Slow it down. Slow it down, drink it in right, so that we can hold on to those feelings, hold on to those memories. And yeah, we've got to slow it down.

Audra :

I want to say first of all, I cannot believe. We are just about out of time. Believe it or not, I've been. That's what I do is I clock watch because I want to make sure that we don't run over and we are almost out of time, but I have left enough time because I want you to have an opportunity to do a couple of things. First, I want the audience to know where they can reach you and when the book will be published, because I am dying to read this book.

Bomi:

I'm so excited. What I absolutely love. I love connecting with people, I love coaching people. Anybody in the audience wonderful, who would like to, they can reach me. And if they're interested in finding out more about the book, getting updates and things like that, you can reach me on wwwTheBrillianceParadigmcom. And just in there, I've come up with this amazing checklist, free giveaway checklist for the audience, so that you can get a sense of are you doing the things that you should be doing to unlock and own your brilliance, and it's a great tool and guide. Check it out, see it, fill it out. Let me know what you think, let me know how many insights that people find from it and just connect. They can connect at wwwTheBrillianceParadigmcom.

Audra :

So I will make sure that her website is linked in the show notes so you can go directly out from the show notes to her website, and I can attest that she will answer all of her emails. Take advantage of her knowledge and her depth of wisdom, because there is so much that we are holding ourselves back from, and Volme just puts it into perspective to help us get ourselves back on track. So, then, second thing that I want you to do is this is the time where I get to step back from the mic without me interjecting, and I want you to have a private moment directly with the audience, to leave with them a lasting thought for them to carry with them throughout their days Everybody.

Bomi:

I just want to say thank you so much for listening, for being open to hearing what I have to say. Really, I just would love for each and every person listening to know and understand that you are unique. You are the sum of your ancestors, your experiences, your DNA, society, culture, everything you have so much to give. Your brilliance is within you. You just have to believe and have the courage to be willing to see it, own it and know it.

Audra :

Okay, everyone, she's giving you permission to go out and reclaim your brilliance.

Bomi:

Oh, it's a challenge, more than oh, it's a challenge. What's a dare? I dare you.

Audra :

Even better, even better. Okay, she's daring you all to go reclaim your brilliance, because you've got it. You absolutely have it. It's there. You just misplaced it for a little bit, so go find it. Exactly Bowming, thank you so much for spending this time with me today. I have enjoyed every minute that I get to spend with you, this recording and outside of it. You are such an amazing, incredible woman. As I have said to you before we came on, I feel like I've known you my entire life, so thank you for being here with me and with the audience and sharing with all of them your precious gift.

Bomi:

Oh, thank you so much. You know, it's always such a beautiful, wonderful pleasure to spend time with you. And, you know, thank you for bringing all of these amazing women together to support each other and grow and bring wisdom to each other. And, as you know, it's always a wonderful, wonderful pleasure to spend time with you.

Audra :

Thank you, thank you, thank you. This is my. This is me reclaiming my brilliance. I am trying to fulfill, turning my light on and everybody else that I get to talk to and touch through this medium.

Bomi:

Oh, you're doing more than trying, audra. You're succeeding, you're succeeding.

Audra :

I'll take it. I'll take it. I want to thank all of you again for listening with me this week and we'll see you again next time.

Unlocking Our Brilliant
Unleashing Potential
Choosing Self-Care and Rewriting Our Narrative
Embrace Journey, Reclaim Brilliance
Expressing Gratitude and Empowerment With Friends