Women in the Arena

Redefining Academics: The Journey of an Inventive Teacher

August 09, 2023 Audra Agen Season 6 Episode 2
Women in the Arena
Redefining Academics: The Journey of an Inventive Teacher
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Ever meet a bright child lagging behind academically and wondered why? Well, our guest today, Tina Kramer, will blow your mind with her revolutionary approach towards understanding these intelligent but struggling learners. A former traditional classroom teacher turned inventor, Tina shares her journey from teaching in Hong Kong to developing a sound device that enhances focus in students. She throws light on an often overlooked group of learners - the perceptual learners, and how they think in pictures and  getting lost in their imagination.

Tina’s device isn't limited to aiding students alone, but it's also proved to be a boon for people with high-functioning autism. Our conversation takes an intriguing turn when Tina shares her personal story of how this sound device helped her former husband, diagnosed with high-functioning autism, to not only improve his focus but also emotionally connect with their children. This episode is a testament to the power of understanding learning differences and celebrating our unique intelligence. Tune in, and you might just find the answers to help that bright yet struggling learner in your life!


https://www.simplelearningedu.com/

Go check out all of our episodes on our website: https://womeninthearena.net/


If you are ready to tell your story or want to refer someone, please email me at audra@womeninthearena.net

***Last thing- I'd love to interview the following women:

  • Joan Jett
  • Dolly Parton
  • Viola Davis
  • Ina Garten

Maybe you can help me get there****


Thank you all for supporting this show and all of the Women in the Arena!!

Audra :

Welcome in everyone and thank you so much for joining me again this week. You know they have said many times that necessity is the mother of invention, and my guest today is certainly a phenomenal example of that. My guest is Tina Kramer and she was a traditional classroom teacher. I'll bet overseas and we'll ask her about that. But in her experience you started to notice that there were some students that were falling behind, not any less intelligent, just struggling with some issues with focus. So she sought out to create a device that will not only correct the focus but improve the focus and allow these intelligent individuals to perform at their absolute top level. I'm super excited for you all to get to know Tina and hear more about her story and why she decided to invent this device. It is my pleasure and my honor to introduce to you Tina Kramer. Tina, thank you so much for being here and welcome to the show. Thank you, it's my pleasure. You are a traditional teacher, but not here. You were a traditional teacher overseas for international schools, so tell us a little bit about that experience of being a teacher overseas.

Tina :

So, yes, I originally taught here in the United States and in from the United States, and I had a degree in elementary education, and then I got the opportunity to move to Hong Kong and taught in the international schools of Hong Kong. I was a seventh and eighth grade math and science teacher and I had these amazing students in my classes that were clearly intelligent when I was having a conversation with them, however, on their written work they were failing, and there were a handful of them like it wasn't C work, it wasn't C minus work, it wasn't D work. They were failing my classes.

Audra :

So you started to notice that this trend of these incredibly intelligent students failing their classes, Were these students that were military families? Were they students that lived there in Hong Kong? What was the makeup of your students?

Tina :

Well, interestingly enough, I had students from 23 different countries. So an international school in order to be considered an international school, they have to have an English speaking section. So most of my students were expats. They, literally their families, were working there in Hong Kong and then the school was chosen as a good fit for the family. Some of them stayed several years. Others of them would come in and possibly be there two years. It depended on their parents' contracts as to how long they were actually there. Interestingly enough, I had one particular young lady and I always say she springboarded my career. So, like I said, I was a math and science teacher and at the beginning of the year you have parent teacher conferences or get to know the teacher, meet and greet. So I started the year that way and there was a particular mother, as I was meeting other parents, that was standing off to the side. Now, I had no idea who she was, but I watched her consistently, watch me, and I got the feeling that she was waiting Until the other parents cleared out so she could come and have a conversation with me. And she did. You know, we got towards the end of the evening and I got a break and meeting with parents and she came up to me and she said you have my daughter in your class and I was new to that school at that point in time and I said all the things that you say oh, it's a pleasure and I look forward to having your daughter in my room. And very bluntly and even quite harsh, she says well, you'll be the first math teacher she ever had that liked her. Wow, yeah, I was like I don't know what to say right now. So again I say the things that you say. I will be sure to pay close attention. You know, bring her to the top of my list. It sounds like she struggles in math. And again I got that really harsh answer of our entire family's crap at math. We always have been, I have been, and she'll never be able to do it either, to where I kind of went. Yes, ma'am, what do you?

Audra :

say to that, so throwing your terrible numbers, I mean, what else do you say?

Tina :

So mom was actually right, she was a lovely student. Sometimes when we have students in our classes that struggle, you'll see them struggle across the board. You know they'll have trouble in reading, they'll have trouble in academics. Sometimes they're not. You see other things. And this particular young girl her name was Caroline, she was the exception. She was adored by her peers, very popular, she played rugby, she was quite accomplished in sports and she did well in all of her other classes, all of her other teachers. They liked her as well. So she was a bit of a mystery because when she got into math class with me like the simple multiplication tables usually students will learn They'll do their twos, they'll do their fives, their tens, and I would get it to the point where I would help her. I thought she had it by the next day. She lost all of the information and she was a hardworking kid. She came at lunch. She stayed after school. I tutored her. She was somebody that was really putting the work in and wanted to succeed. Now, in hindsight, she had what is called dyscalculia. Now dyscalculia is the equivalent of dyslexia. However, dyslexia, we know, is associated with letters and reading and dyscalculia is associated with numbers and math.

Audra :

Interesting. First of all, I've never heard of dyscalculia. That is new for me.

Tina :

And that's quite common. And at that point in time in my career I'd have to say I'd heard of it but I didn't really understand it. So this particular young lady, to have somebody like that that worked that hard and wasn't succeeding and I saw her doing well in her other classes so this spring boarded my commitment to find help and I literally started doing research in very non-traditional areas. Anything I could read that I could find additional information, because I knew with my traditional education I was not creating success for her. And I came across information that talked about the gifts of a perceptual learner. Now, have you heard of a perceptual learner? Do you know what I mean by that?

Audra :

No, I was about ready to ask you to pause and educate me, because I have no idea what that is.

Tina :

So a perceptual learner is an individual that thinks, or tends to think, in pictures, extremely creative think in terms of engineers, pilots, artists, dancers, the gift. So the way that they think is also actually the source of the problem. So when they're presented with confusion, they tend to go off into their imagination looking for answers, literally looking at pictures in their imagination. But think about the nature of teaching. In teaching, I was consistently presenting new information and by the process of presenting new information I am creating confusion. I mean, the goal is to clear up the confusion as they learn. But if you think this way and you're perceptually gifted and then there's confusion or new information is presented, you go off into your imagination to be able to find pictures, to create a foundation, to build upon.

Audra :

Basically, I'm picturing that these students have walking talking Pinterest in their brain. That's fair.

Tina :

I haven't heard that analogy, but that's actually a really good analogy. So it's a little easier for me to get people to understand when I use words. So if I say house, dog or flower, you just got a picture, I did. But if I say the, there or is no picture, nothing but if you think yeah nothing. Yeah, if you think in pictures, all right, and you are thinking about the, is the, there, the non-picture words, then you're going off into your imagination looking for a picture, looking for an answer. However, if you never find that answer, then you stay off into your imagination. So these are the kids and we used to laugh in the classroom. They'd be like Mrs K I just squirreled, say that again. We don't know what you just said. We missed the whole last five minutes of everything you just taught.

Audra :

So they just they, literally just. They were too far into their imagination trying to make sense of it and they lost it.

Tina :

Yes, yes, so we call this a disorientation. This process is actually called a disorientation and that disorientation you're you know it's for neurotypical individuals, for and I don't like this word normal learners. But for the sake of explanation let's go with normal learners. They might have their minds drift off, all right, we all space out from time to time, but they're able to come back. And for perceptually gifted individuals, sometimes that disorientation is so big that it takes a lot longer for them to come back and then when they do, it's confusion and then they're unclear. In this particular young lady, caroline now, she experienced disorientation associated with numbers. So then we took a look at how she learned, made her aware of her disorientations. Now we're gonna get into the sound device a little bit. So I have to introduce this idea of a sound device. It was so interesting to me because they do space out, they go off into their imagination. I literally I started, really literally thinking about what I was saying to the students, like where'd you go? Hey, come back. So I figured out ways in the traditional classroom to hold their attention, just simple things that I was doing. But then I started thinking in terms of because they weren't doing well in their other classes and then they'd struggle with homework. So how could I create that same focused attention when I wasn't with them? And then that's how the idea for the sound device actually it was born. So what that is is a small device it's about the size of a half dollar and you wear it like a necklace and there is a low, intermittent sound. And when I say low, literally, I have students, kids, wearing them within the classroom, and then I have adults that are now wearing them as part of business and in the boardroom. So have you heard of tuning fork before?

Audra :

Yeah, I've seen a tuning fork. They use it in music and they use it to tune musical instruments.

Tina :

Okay so, absolutely so. My clients compare this to a tuning fork, but there's an initial hit and then there's like this resonation that goes back and forth and it's too low for me to. You can't hear it over the microphone, but it literally does the same thing that I did as a classroom teacher. It's like this sound is that tap on the shoulder going hey, where did you go? Come back, bring your focus back, let's get our work done. And the really exciting thing about it is, like I said, it can be worn in the classroom, it can be worn in the boardroom and it's so low that others don't hear it and it's doing the work for you.

Audra :

So what made you think about? Oh, I know, I'll create this sound device. I mean, that, I think is in and of itself is remarkable that you recognize that your words were helping people refocus and you somehow tied that to this low-frequency sound. How did you figure that out? That's, I would never have put those two together.

Tina :

So I have a learning difference myself. I was almost 50 when I was diagnosed with ADD, but I always suspected that I was one of these perceptually gifted, creative people. My own journey through school was challenging, but I am a really good listener and I was asking questions and one of the things that I would consistently hear from my students' parents that I knew struggled was they had tried music therapy and there's different versions of this. Now what they literally what they told me. They would say this didn't fix it. However, it made life better. We definitely saw a positive change. We definitely saw a positive difference. Then the other thing, remember I started traveling the world looking in very non-traditional areas for answers. In some of the practitioners that I would see used tuning forks. I would be like why are you using a tuning fork on me? I don't understand. I came in here with back pain. I came in here and they would talk about the fact that sound and our senses we have five senses but that we can actually use hearing as part of the healing process. There was a particular practitioner that I saw for my own health and he and I started having these conversations. I started saying, hey, what if we would actually use sound to help us focus. Then we started experimenting with different sounds Through that process. That's how the idea of the sound device was born. It was one of those creative moments where I was just listening and paying attention to the people around me and moved into a very literal place. And then I was lacking enough to have a practitioner that I went hey, what do you think about this? He's like well, let's give it a try.

Audra :

You've been able to create this device and you had this ripe literal classroom to test this on. I did. What were the initial results? With your students.

Tina :

Very positive, which I am incredibly thankful for. Now I'm going to add another piece of my journey in here. This was happening in my professional life, but then in my personal life, I had been married for 30 years. My marriage was challenging. I was married to this incredibly gifted and talented, intelligent individual that really struggled with emotional connection, but I had always lived in small town USA, being originally from Indiana. Everybody saw the success in his career. When I would start to discuss the challenges we're experiencing at home, if I'm totally honest, I think they thought I was a little crazy. So when we got to Hong Kong and we saw doctors because doctors were always a part of his life he started with anxiety and anxiousness and those type of things. We saw a particular doctor and the doctor, within about 10 minutes of sitting down and talking with him, said have you ever considered the fact you have Asperger's Now? At that particular time we were still using the term Asperger's. We no longer do. We now talk about high functioning autism, but he was then diagnosed with that. So now, all of a sudden, my personal life had crossed my professional life. We had two children and I wanted them to be able to emotionally connect with their father and through that, through that striving to try to create that, because I was not the person when they said you know, it's autism. I was not the person that said, oh okay, I'm just going to accept that, I went okay. Well, how are you going to fix it? How are we going to?

Audra :

learn to live with this and not make it a disability, just a different ability. So now you had not only do you have a classroom, you now have a husband that has been given a diagnosis of high functioning autism. Yes, you had these two areas in which to test this new theory. And because at this point it wasn't even a device, it wasn't a reality, it was let's see. Let's see what happens, yes. So I'm going to ask did you test it on your husband, your former husband, I should say, oh, absolutely. Okay, excellent, okay, let's start there first. So what was the results, or the initial results, of wearing this new sound device?

Tina :

So, interestingly enough, we saw improved focus and, depending on the individuals, the focus for some it was immediate, I mean almost to the point that I would give the sound to them and it was like you would see their eyes brighten. They would look around in the sense of oh my gosh, you know, it just really improved their ability, got them grounded and brought them back to self, while others it was more of a journey and it was a slow process for them. You have to keep in mind, if people go to my website and they actually take a look at the sound device, what I have on there now versus what was happening way back then were very different. They looked very different. We were dealing with prototypes, but across the board we were seeing positive change.

Audra :

So, even with your husband, with this, like I said, different ability, did that improve, improved in focus, his focus, but did it improve his ability to connect emotionally?

Tina :

That came later. That's very much a part of a process. I often tell people the amount of money that we spent in different areas, different therapies. I have to be honest, a lot of it didn't work. I literally could have built two houses for the amount of money that we invested in trying to support and help him. However, it was not for naught it all. It took a long time because we didn't know what we were doing. There was a lot of trial and error that went on. This is back in 2007, 2008, when all of this work really started and I didn't know what I was doing. I was just trying different things. So here we are, several years later, but in the last two or three years he has emotionally connected with our children, which is just absolutely beautiful. I have met new people, new practitioners that have given me more ideas and build upon the work that I originally started with, and we just keep adapting, but we do have the ability to support somebody in that developmental process so that they actually can emotionally connect. Now, please don't think it's a snap of the fingers and a quick and easy thing. It takes time, it takes life experiences, but we now actually can, which is such a blessing. You know part of my life that marriage. It was incredibly challenging and to be able to take the information and some of the challenges that my family experienced and turn it into a positive so that others don't have to go through what we went through, that really is a goal of mine and a passion of mine to make a positive change for others.

Audra :

Well, I'm going to ask a little bit more. I want to expand on this a little bit. Don't let me forget to come back to the classroom, because I most definitely want to hear what the results are in the classroom, but I want to stay here for a moment because I'm super fascinated by this. So you have this sound device that is helping with an individual on the spectrum. Yeah, was it tested on individuals that suffer from depression, anxiety, maybe just good old-fashioned twitchiness, people that can't sit still? There are those people and we all have them in our lives that you just simply can't sit still, and I think that's probably something to do with anxiety. So were you able to put your attention on some of these individuals and test their responses to this?

Tina :

Yes, now, all of this has been in my own practice and it's been over the last two years that the Sound Device has really been available to the public, that you can go onto my website and you can purchase it. But I have other practitioners that have been using them as well and, as you say, we've been running the trials. What kind of results do we really get? Interestingly enough, I usually am talking with or working with people that have dyslexia, add, adhd or on the autism spectrum. Now there are the individuals that get the formal diagnosis and then there are the individuals that have symptoms of. I often find myself working with the people that have symptoms of that would never really qualify for a formal diagnosis. So let me explain it this way Dr Tony Atwood he was quite famous with his work with a high functioning autism, and one time he said imagine a puzzle. In order to get a formal diagnosis, you have to have 80% of those puzzle pieces. But what about the individuals that have 50%? What about the individual that have 20%? And oh, by the way, if you're a member of the human race, you're going to have 10 to 15 of those puzzle pieces. So for the individual that just can't set still, but would never get a diagnosis of ADHD. Yes, this helps as well.

Audra :

And then what about those individuals that are having depression issues?

Tina :

Right now. It's very interesting. In my practice I see a lot of anxiety and depression because of lack of awareness. So individuals that actually have learning differences and there are words that creep into their vocabulary or into their life. So I'm going to go back to that mother that I talked about originally, caroline's mom. Caroline's mother didn't know anything about dyscalculia, nor did she know the symptoms of dyscalculia. What she said was my family is crap at math and we always have been. So I run into people that will talk to me about well, I'm lazy, I never have been able to keep a job, I have trouble with motivation, I'm clumsy, I'm the person that runs into things. Or I'm the person that was a kid in school that would catch a ball and instead it would hit me in the head because I didn't know where my body was. And you hear these catch phrases Individuals that don't know the difference between left and right. There's actually a very viable reason as to why that happens, and I hear things like I'm dumb, I'm stupid I don't like that word at all, but they fall into these areas of putting themselves down and thinking negative about themselves when, all actuality, they don't have the education, they don't have the awareness to understand how the focus affects the way that we learn, the way that we move through life and how we are.

Audra :

Well, I'm going to ask a selfish question just because it's top of mind for me and, quite frankly, the demographic that is drawn to this show is experiencing something like this currently. Yes, okay, brain fog. I am smack dab in the middle of menopause. I have not made that a secret because it is just part of life, and I've been able to manage a lot of the symptoms. The one that makes me the most crazy Actually, there's two One is the sleeplessness, which is awful, and two is the brain fog Not being able to think clearly and sharply like you used to, like you knew you used to. I used to be able to rattle things off right off the top of my head, and now my brain is slow. So, like I said, I'm asking this selfish question about this having the ability to help with that focus.

Tina :

So I am not a doctor, I'm a teacher, I'm a coach If there's an aspect or a side of that that's related to your physical health so here in the United States there's a whole conversation around the junk that's put into our food that causes brain fog. However, if part of this is truly related to your ability to be able to focus, then yes, I would be able to help with that. So let me go back to this disorientation. Everybody disorients. In fact, in order for us to fall asleep, we disorient. It's just part of the process. However, when I'm dealing with a client or a student that has trouble with disorientation throughout the day, it also tends to affect them at night. So in more severe forms they'll have trouble sleeping, sleepwalking, those type of things. However, if we are able to improve their ability to be in a state of orientation, then you see that process change and they'll move into disorientation so that they can fall asleep. So that's the case where disorientation is a good thing. So I had a student. He was seventh grader. He suffered with pretty severe anxiety. I never suggest it just didn't occur to me that to use the sound device during night to help you sleep. And the mother called me and she said he has a horrible time sleeping. The sound device was beside his bed when he fell asleep or when he woke up in the middle of the night and he just got it and he put it on because he wakes up into anxiety and it is allowing him to fall asleep or fall back asleep. She's like is that okay that he's wearing it while he's sleeping, if it?

Audra :

works absolutely.

Tina :

But that's where I started to kind of change my story around the sound device then, because I'm talking about using it for orientation during the day that young man, he was smart enough to know. Well, this actually helps me fall back asleep at night. So that was a long-winded answer to your question. Yes, it is possible, it could help you. We're just going to have to get one in your hands. You try it and you let me know.

Audra :

Everyone will give it a shot, because you never know, because I know I'm not the only one sitting in this seat right now, because it's just life and you just manage it. I want to get back to the results that you saw in the classroom, because once you brought this device into the classroom which is what started it it was the inspiration with Caroline. What were the initial results bringing it into the classroom for those students?

Tina :

And for you as the teacher. So we saw, improved focus is the simplest way to be able to answer that question. The other thing, however, is there are lessons that we learn from life through life experiences. When we're neurotypical Now, when you have a learning difference, you learn differently. So therefore you're not picking up the same information from the life experiences. So over time. The other thing that I saw was were these individuals started making connections that I didn't even know they were missing. So this has come from research and trial and error. But, for example, change, consequence and sequencing. These are really big concepts that tend to be learned from life experiences. However, they're not learning them. So that's part of the coaching that I now do and I include these concepts in the coaching process. Almost the sound device does the work for them to help them be able to focus, and if I can put that roadmap in place, it just kind of makes things go quicker. It makes them go more smoothly. So a lot of the programs that are out there, let's put it this way I put a foundation in place Underneath what's taught in the traditional school system and then it's almost like when the foundation gets there in place, then everything else falls in place so I can work with, let's say, a student that has dyslexia. They do the work, they take the responsibility. Within six weeks I can have them at grade level Because that information is already there.

Audra :

We're just giving them the anchors and the foundations to connect to six weeks, and I mean, and dyslexia is a lifetime issue that people have to manage and they learn to Live with, and you're saying that you have improved their lives in six weeks.

Tina :

Yes, now there's exceptions. There's always different levels of things. But if it's a true case to where they're missing this ability to be able to focus, they're they're unaware of their disorientations, then we actually can get that foundation in place. They have to do the work. I always say this is not a quick fix, this is for somebody that's willing to take responsibility. But if they take responsibility and do the work absolutely within six weeks, it's very possible.

Audra :

Wow. So you're working with both students. So you're working with adolescents. You're also working with adults. What have been some of the results that you have seen from adults just by giving them this, this device that Brings their focus back to whatever they have at hand?

Tina :

It's interesting. My niche of work has definitely changed when I started to work with adults, so for me I see more adults than I do students. Now, however, I can give you references and I still have people that are doing work very similar to my own that work with students. The the exciting thing is that all home aha moment when the an adult goes, I really am smart. When they understand what they've been dealing with for most of their life is related to a lack of education, they start to understand how their focus works and how it affects the way that they learn, and they'll almost Always with an adult I will see tears of joy and I'll that moment when they go, I really am smart. And Then there's some identity work that I do and it's quick. The work that I do is quick because people we're all moving so fast. We don't have time delay on the couch Talk for two years like what we used to, and there's nothing wrong with that. I'm not discrediting it that. I'm just saying, through some of my own challenges that I experienced, I found practitioners that can and make change quickly and have incorporated that into the work that I do. So and you don't have to do a coaching program with me. I have people that have are buying and wearing the sound devices and they describe it as simple as when I hit that mid-afternoon slump and I used to go for the second or third cup of coffee. I don't need it anymore and it's increasing my productivity, it's increasing my self-awareness and my overall sense of well-being is More positive than it was before.

Audra :

Wow, that's. I mean that. Think about the people that you are surrounded with every single day, your co-workers. Whether you're with them physically or If you're all still in a virtual environment, you know when that afternoon slump hits for most of us, because you can see that they're their little dot on their computer goes yellow and they're probably going for a walk or they're going to get some coffee or Whatever, because they've been concentrating all day and they hit a wall. Yes, and you're saying that this device may allow them to get over that hump a little bit easier.

Tina :

Yes, yes, it just makes it more positive, smoother. Yeah, absolutely. And then there are other people that experience huge changes and I. I have to come back to Caroline. So, like I said, this has been back in, you know, 2006 7. That period of time she was Actually in the seventh grade because she was in my seventh grade math class. She's originally from South Africa and she sent me a letter. She had entered into college and the letter basically said Mrs Kramer, you were my teacher that changed my life. It was something I will cherish for the rest of my life and I I Never really I don't think got to say this to her, but she helped so many people because she was the reason I was not willing to accept the way that I was teaching anymore and I wanted to create positive change and between her and my own family I was determined to help others so I didn't have to go through what I went through and what others go through. So, yeah, that letter means the world to me and she graduated with a B average in math.

Audra :

Wow, with the B average in math. Wait, way to go, caroline, and way to go, tina. Possible you, you had actually answered a question that was just about ready to ask, which was what's your favorite success story? And it's got to be the very first one.

Tina :

Yeah, it is. It's her, and I've been so blessed to work with some really amazing fearless people, but, yeah, that first one that put me on this path Absolutely.

Audra :

So this is so fascinating and exciting that there are people walking around on the planet right now Perhaps even some of them are listening right now that they're thinking I'm tired, I'm overwhelmed, my focus is is difficult. They may just be experiencing the world a little bit differently than Neuro typical, whatever the heck that means anymore. Yeah, I mean, let's face it, I'm a Gen X, or we weren't taught how to Not work in the world other than the regular way we've had to adapt to, to show up in the world the way that is expected. The world did not adapt to us. There have been so many more advances For the subsequent generations on, oh well, everybody's different. You don't need to do things the same thing as the other person does, and that's acceptable now, but there's a whole generation of people that are wandering around, confined in a, in a structure or box or a process that wasn't built for them. And You're saying that? Well, just maybe. Just maybe you're just having issues with focus.

Tina :

Yes, and the school systems look just like you said. They're unaware and I can't tell you the amount of people that I'll meet and they tell me their story and you know they suffer. It affects, cross the self-esteem across the board. And if we can have these conversations to raise awareness and make the changes in our school system, you know they come to the conclusion of oh my gosh, I'm perceptually gifted, I'm just as great and smart and the capable is everybody else's. I just didn't have all the information I need it.

Audra :

No, and I have often said that your difference is your superpower. What you do differently, yeah, is your advantage, although it presents initially as your disadvantage. Once you learn how to harness it, that becomes your fuel for whatever it is that you were put on this earth to do. Yeah, there's a reason why you were given a different set of of abilities because your, your purpose is different than someone else's. Really fascinating, very, very intriguing, and I'm so, I'm so interested in learning more, and I'm sure that the audience has a curiosity if they wanted to learn more about Not just your device, but the work that you do and your success stories, how would they?

Tina :

reach you. So the best thing would be to go to my website, which is wwwsimplelearningeducom, and I'm sure we'll include that in the in the comments. But go there, message me, and Then I can answer questions, and then I think it's important to listen. So everybody has their own unique story.

Audra :

If I can get a little more information about them, then I can make the connections for their success as well well, I think you for for taking up this challenge and Recognizing that there is something that you can do to make their lives better, and so, in my opinion, that makes you a world-changer. So thank you for taking the leap of faith and being a world-changer. This is the part of the show that I usually like to step back from the mic and give you an open forum to leave a Final, lasting thought with the audience, and it is. It could be words of encouragement or something that is been on your heart. So I'm gonna step back and let you go ahead and have the floor.

Tina :

Wow, thank you so much. So I had a learning difference myself. If I look back to my own school experience, I was the kid that didn't want anybody to know how much I was struggling behind the scenes. I was the kid that was taking the information they presented to me in school, taking it home and basically memorizing it. I was going over and over and over Until I could get it to the point that I could pass the test. I Tended to be a good student. My teachers like me. I got good grades, but the amount of stress that I was dealing with was just too much. Looking back on that, that actually, like you've pointed out before, my difference became my success story. If you're struggling, don't assume that there's something wrong with you, that you need to hide from the world. Step into the world of self education, self-responsibility, and let's find answers for you so that you don't have to struggle anymore. Because if I've had the information that I know now for my own struggles, my life could have been so much different, and I don't want you to struggle like I did. I want to make it a little easier.

Audra :

Well, tina, thank you for that and thank you for being so willing to be vulnerable about your own struggles so that someone out there, someone else out there, will hear it and go oh, I'm not alone. Yeah, not at all. There's someone else just like me and there might be a solution. So I want to thank you for being here today to Tell us about your work, the, your invention that you have created to help improve Individuals lot lives, from small improvements to big improvements. I'm I'm very fascinated to hear more about it and I will report back and let you guys know how that. I will test it and let you know how it goes, because Anything that can help this would be awesome, and if you have questions, please forward them to me and I'll make sure Tina gets them. If we get enough questions, maybe we'll just have a live Q&A. What would you think of that?

Tina :

Oh, I'd love that.

Audra :

That'd be awesome. All right guys flood me with questions so we can bring her back and do a live Q&A to answer all your questions Right on the spot. So, tina, thank you one more time for being here. I appreciate your time and I appreciate you educating me and everyone else. Once again, thank you. Thank you so much as well. Bye-bye, thank you to all of you for being here and we'll see you again next time. You.

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